marbleslab:

Blue & Purple

 by markchadwickart 

(Source: lackist, via crime-fetish)

Timestamp: 1411991540

marbleslab:

Blue & Purple

 by markchadwickart 

(Source: lackist, via crime-fetish)

missvermilion:

Front Line Assembly

(via lucifer242)

Timestamp: 1411991155

missvermilion:

Front Line Assembly

(via lucifer242)

super-collider:

detail from STS-63 crew photo
credit: NASA

(via lucifer242)

Timestamp: 1411991151

super-collider:

detail from STS-63 crew photo
credit: NASA

(via lucifer242)

(Source: digg, via theory-0f-everything)

zerostatereflex:

MIT Robotic Cheetah

Oh HELL YES. Notice in the 2nd gif the “cheetah” runs untethered.

"MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for bounding that they’ve successfully implemented in a robotic cheetah."

AWESOME.

"The key to the bounding algorithm is in programming each of the robot’s legs to exert a certain amount of force in the split second during which it hits the ground, in order to maintain a given speed: In general, the faster the desired speed, the more force must be applied to propel the robot forward. In experiments the robot sprinted up to 10 mph and MIT researchers estimate the robot may eventually reach speeds of up to 30 mph.

(via theory-0f-everything)

Timestamp: 1410944256

zerostatereflex:

MIT Robotic Cheetah

Oh HELL YES. Notice in the 2nd gif the “cheetah” runs untethered.

"MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for bounding that they’ve successfully implemented in a robotic cheetah."

AWESOME.

"The key to the bounding algorithm is in programming each of the robot’s legs to exert a certain amount of force in the split second during which it hits the ground, in order to maintain a given speed: In general, the faster the desired speed, the more force must be applied to propel the robot forward. In experiments the robot sprinted up to 10 mph and MIT researchers estimate the robot may eventually reach speeds of up to 30 mph.

(via theory-0f-everything)

nubbsgalore:

male mouthbrooding jawfish — such as the mottled (seen in the fifth photo with spikes on the side of its head from a fireworm attack), the yellowhead, the banded, and the cardinalfish seen here —  use their mouths to protect their eggs until the fry hatch. 

mouthbrooding fish are able to produce smaller numbers of offspring with a higher chance of survival than species that offer no broodcare. the males, however, are not able to eat during this period of incubation (which can last anywhere from one to three weeks), but will open their mouths, spitting and sucking the eggs back in to keep them clean and aerated. 

photos by (click pic) nicolas terryshigeru harazaki, steven kovacs, keri wilk, michael patrikc oneilll and marcello di francesco 

(via theory-0f-everything)

Timestamp: 1410944189

nubbsgalore:

male mouthbrooding jawfish — such as the mottled (seen in the fifth photo with spikes on the side of its head from a fireworm attack), the yellowhead, the banded, and the cardinalfish seen here —  use their mouths to protect their eggs until the fry hatch. 

mouthbrooding fish are able to produce smaller numbers of offspring with a higher chance of survival than species that offer no broodcare. the males, however, are not able to eat during this period of incubation (which can last anywhere from one to three weeks), but will open their mouths, spitting and sucking the eggs back in to keep them clean and aerated. 

photos by (click pic) nicolas terryshigeru harazaki, steven kovacs, keri wilk, michael patrikc oneilll and marcello di francesco 

(via theory-0f-everything)

lahoriblefollia:

Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk

(via tacticalneuralimplant)

Timestamp: 1410943841

lahoriblefollia:

Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk

(via tacticalneuralimplant)

(Source: sofachips, via fax-the-facts)

(Source: fruitsoftheweb, via cosmicamel)